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Works by
Angelina Weld Grimke
(Poet, Journalist, Writer)
[1880 - 1958]

Profile created January 8, 2007
See also:
  • In Memory (1880) by Theodore Dwight Weld

  • Letters of Theodore Dwight Weld, Angelina Grimké Weld and Sarah Grimké, 1822-1844 (1934)

  • Letters of Theodore Dwight Weld, Angelina Grimk and Sarah Grimk, 1822-1844 (1965) by Theodore Dwight Weld

  • Letters of Theodore Dwight Weld, Angelina Grimke Weld, and Sarah Grimke (1970) by Gilbert Hobbs Barnes

  • The Grimke Sisters from South Carolina (1978) by Gerda Lerner
    A landmark work of women's history originally published in 1967, Gerda Lerner's best-selling biography of Sarah and Angelina Grimke explores the lives and ideas of the only southern women to become antislavery agents in the North and pioneers for women's rights. This revised and expanded edition includes two new primary documents and an additional essay by Lerner. In a revised introduction Lerner reinterprets her own work nearly forty years later and gives new recognition to the major significance of Sarah Grimke's feminist writings.

  • Color, Sex and Poetry: Three Women Writers of the Harlem Renaissance (1987) by Gloria T. Hull

  • Afro-American Women Writers 1746-1933: An Anthology and Critical Guide (1989) by Ann Allen Shockley

  • Signatures of Citizenship: Petitioning, Antislavery, and Women's Political Identity (2003) by Susan Zaeske
    In this comprehensive history of women's antislavery petitions addressed to Congress, Susan Zaeske argues that by petitioning, women not only contributed significantly to the movement to abolish slavery but also made important strides toward securing their own rights and transforming their own political identity.

    By analyzing the language of women's antislavery petitions, speeches calling women to petition, congressional debates, and public reaction to women's petitions from 1831 to 1865, Zaeske reconstructs and interprets debates over the meaning of female citizenship. At the beginning of their political campaign in 1835 women tended to disavow the political nature of their petitioning, but by the 1840s they routinely asserted women's right to make political demands of their representatives. This rhetorical change, from a tone of humility to one of insistence, reflected an ongoing transformation in the political identity of petition signers, as they came to view themselves not as subjects but as citizens. Having encouraged women's involvement in national politics, women's antislavery petitioning created an appetite for further political participation that spurred countless women after the Civil War and during the first decades of the twentieth century to promote causes such as temperance, anti-lynching laws, and woman suffrage.

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