DREAMWalker Group
Where creativity and spirit converge

 

 

 
To assist you in finding books you enjoy reading, you can search this site for authors or artists and look at their profile pages:
 

By first name

By last name

By subjects

 

 

SPONSORS

A bridge supporting dialog

 

Michael Walker's Blog
(Awakened Man's World)

Our DREAMTeam

Email Us

 

 

Affiliates

 

Works by
John T. Irwin
(aka John Bricuth)

(Poet, Writer)

jirwin@jhu.edu
http://web.jhu.edu/writingseminars/faculty/irwin
Profile created November 17, 2006
Literary Criticism (Writing as John T. Irwin)
  • Doubling and Incest / Repetition and Reveng: A Speculative Reading of Faulkner (1975)
    When it was first published, Doubling and Incest/Repetition and Revenge proved to be a seminal work in the psychoanalytic study of Faulkner's fiction, especially of The Sound and the Fury and Absalom, Absalom! This softcover reissue of John Irwin's masterful exposition unwinds the mystery of unconscious desire and doubling that inform the novels.

  • American Hieroglyphics: The Symbol of the Egyptian Hieroglyphics in the American Renaissance (1980)

  • Figurations of the Writer's Death: Freud and Hart Crane (1980)

  • The Mystery to a Solution: Poe, Borqes. and the Analytical Detective Story (1994)
    In The Mystery to a Solution, John Irwin brilliantly examines the deeper significance of the analytical detective genre which Poe created and the meaning of Borges' efforts to "double" the genre's origins one hundred years later. Combining history, literary history, and practical and speculative criticism, Irwin pursues the issues underlying the detective story into areas as various as the history of mathematics, classical mythology, the double-mirror structure of self-consciousness, the anthropology of Evans and Frazer, the structure of chess, the mind-body problem, the etymology of the word labyrinth, and dozens of other topics. Irwin mirrors the aesthetic impact of the genre by creating in his study the dynamics of a detective story--the uncovering of mysteries, the accumulation of evidence, the tracing of clues, and the final solution that ties it all together.

  • Unless the Threat of Death Is Behind Them: Hard-Boiled Fiction and Film Noir (2006)
    Early in the twentieth century a new character type emerged in the crime novels of American writers such as Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler: the "hard-boiled" detective, most famously exemplified by Sam Spade in The Maltese Falcon. Unlike the analytical detectives of nineteenth-century fiction, such as Edgar Allan Poe's Inspector Dupin, the new detectives encountered cases not as intricate logical puzzles but as stark challenges of manhood. In the stories of these characters and their criminal opposites, John T. Irwin explores the tension within ideas of American masculinity between subordination and independence and, for the man who becomes "his own boss," the conflict between professional codes and personal desires. He shows how, within different works of hard-boiled fiction, the professional either overcomes the personal or is overcome by it, ending in ruinous relationships or in solitary integrity, and how within the genre all notions of manly independence are ultimately revealed to be illusions subordinate to fate itself.

    Tracing the stylistic development of the genre, Irwin demonstrates the particular influence of the novel of manners, especially the writing of F. Scott Fitzgerald. He goes on to argue that, from the time of World War II, when hard-boiled fiction began to appear on the screen in film noir just as women entered the workforce in large numbers, many of its themes came to extend to female empowerment. Finally, he discusses how these themes persist in contemporary dramatic series on television, representing the conflicted lives of Americans into the twenty-first century.

Poetry (Writing as John Bricuth)
  • The Heisenberg Variations (1981)

  • Just Let Me Say This About That (1998)

  • As Long As It's Big (2005)

    See also:

    • Words Brushed by Music: Twenty-Five Years of the Johns Hopkins Poetry Series (2004) by Anthony Hecht
      Over the past twenty-five years, the Johns Hopkins Poetry and Fiction series has published thirty-one volumes of poetry, beginning in 1979 with John Hollander's Blue Wine and Other Poems. The series was launched with two guiding principles: to publish works of poetry exhibiting formal excellence and strong emotional appeal and to publish writers at all stages of their careers.

      Words Brushed by Music gathers the best poems of the past twenty-five years, works that exhibit extraordinary wit, elegance, wisdom born of experience, and mastery of language. Sometimes comic, always moving, these poems reflect the talent of twenty distinctive voices: John Bricuth, John Burt, Thomas Carper, Philip Dacey, Tom Disch, Emily Grosholz, Vicki Hearne, John Hollander, Josephine Jacobsen, X. J. Kennedy, Charles Martin, Robert Pack, Robert Phillips, Wyatt Prunty, Gibbons Ruark, William Jay Smith, Barry Spacks, Timothy Steele, David St. John, and Adrien Stoutenburg. In this anniversary volume, award-winning poet and critic Anthony Hecht reflects on the state of American poetry today.

(We need your help! 
Let us know if you have updated information for this page!
Write us at dreamwalkergroup@me.com)

Related Topics

Click any of the following links for more information on similar topics of interest in relation to this page.

John T. Irwin
Is Listed As A Favorite Of
(Alphabetical Order
By First Name)

TO BE DETERMINED

John's Favorite
Authors/Books
(Alphabetical Order
By First Name)
[As of x]

TO BE DETERMINED

DREAMWaker Group is not incorporated as a non-profit organization.

Your donations help defray the cost of running this site but are not tax-deductible
as charitable expenses
.  See your tax consultant for more information.

Site Design and
Copyright 2002-13 by
DREAMWalker Group
Email Us

Proprietor - Michael Walker  

Editorial - Catherine Groves  Michael Walker 

Layout & Design Michael Walker